October 15, 2018 ______________________________________________________________________________________

Contents

  • As bishops’ summit opens, Catholic women say: ‘Let’s be a nuisance!’
  • Prelates Come Marching In, Women Sing, Police Strong Arm
  • Catholic Women Speak network calls for church reform, focus on women
  • For real change, we must get at four roots deeper than church structures
  • Women's Ordination Conference asks you to sign petition to show your support for voting rights for women at the Synod
  • WOMEN PRIESTS - A Catholic Commentary on the Vatican Declaration that only men can be ordained
  • If you won't ordain them, don't baptize them.  You may give them ideas - For altar girls, a modest proposal
  • Racism is more than a sin. It constitutes a heresy that undermines the very identity of the church
  • We are called to the Lord's supper because God calls us to be what we already are, love and mercy for each other
  • Women must fight clericalism to heal church, Women Church World publication says
  • Catholic Women Called - Kathleen Gibbons Schuck
  • Vatican II's reforms to the Mass were right and why the clergy's resistance to fully implementing the revisions are part of our current crisis
  • RCWP Canada Bishop's Message
  • Dancing My Life, Dancing My God
  • Binding The Strong Man
  • Why stay in the Church?  A little different nuance
  • Comments to the Editor
  • Free access to on-line or pdf downloadable books and book-length articles
  • Synod on the Youth 2018 series
  • Tech Tip
  • Francis, the comic strip
  • Links to related information


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RCWP Canada Bishop's Message

Jesus came with a message of God's love and compassion for the poor and the marginalized and with a call to discipleship that embodies that loving tenderness. Today's gospel (28th Sunday in Ordinary Time - Mark 10.17-30) asks that we check our attitude about the reign of God.

Oscar Romero was canonized this morning. A few hours ago Pope Francis named him along with Pope Paul VI and 5 others as among those recognized by the church for their lives of holiness. I see St. Oscar Romero as an embodiment of the message of today's gospel.

When Romero was named archbishop for San Salvador he was considered a “safe” bishop who would protect the church in a country experiencing political unrest. He had friends in high places in the government of the day. However, the people were being exploited, land being taken from them by the government, some were even being killed if they resisted or opposed the injustice. Some peasants challenged Romero's cozy association with government officials -- drinking brandy with them -- while ignoring the plight of the people.

It was the murder of one of his priests, a friend who stood in solidarity with those being exploited, that disturbed Romero and compelled him to check his attitude about what was happening to God's people. He began to speak out against the injustices and atrocities being committed against the poor. He implored the government to stop the killing. This change in him gave hope to the people but it angered those in power. After awhile, he became aware that each time he spoke out he might be the target of the next bullet. On March 24, 1980, while celebrating mass in a hospital chapel, they came for him. After his homily, again pleading for justice, while standing at the altar, he was shot to death.

In his gospel, Mark tells his community that attitude is everything. A rich man thinks that he can get a piece of the kingdom Jesus promises with a little buy-in – flattering Jesus, affirming his goodness, as if the kingdom was like the property the man already held that gave him status and prestige. It's not that easy, Jesus said. He tells the man that it is not only keeping the commandments that is required, especially the ones about envy and covetousness which often underlay the acquisition of land. Jesus also tells him that being part of the kingdom comes with a price – he needed to give up his value system for that of God's value system. His attitude about what was important in the kingdom had to change. He needed to move out of his comfort zone.

Romero came to realize that t
he kingdom of God he was to proclaim was not with the powerful or one that could be obtained by fraudulent means. In fact, the kingdom of God required the restoration of land taken by force. God's loving tenderness is for the poor who are the victims of exploitation and neglect. To God all are important; no one is to be above another. Squabbling about who is first, and who is greatest are the things that have to go. Hierarchy and power are non-starters. The community of believers needs to be concerned about the least among you, exemplified by the children who had no status in Jewish society.

The invitation to follow Jesus, to love as he loved, is given to each of us. As Romero experienced, the two-edged sword of God's word cuts both ways. It invites and it challenges. It disturbs us and calls us out of our comfort zones. We must ask, “Like the man, bound in riches, what binds us from following Jesus? What attitudes of mine need to be changed?”

We celebrated Thanksgiving in Canada this past week. As we look at our blessings and are thankful for them, we may also examine our attitudes toward the poor and the homeless, many who are the indigenous people of our country, and the migrants and refugees of the world.

How are we the beneficiaries of the patriarchal system that colonized the Americas and many countries around the world?

What can we do to restore to wholeness those who have been exploited; to give back some measure of what was taken from them? Can my Thanksgiving also be a moment of making amends, of giving with thanks?

There are many things we can do that embody God's loving tenderness and reach out to those who are marginalized today. Here are a few for your consideration:

A conference on ending poverty in Regina, SK is being held at Knox Met on Wednesday. Perhaps you want attend.


As usual in October, the Regina Food Bank is looking for donations for the winter months. You can double the value of your donation by making it before Oct. 31.
Click here

The
Development and Peace Fall Campaign focuses on the forced displacement of refugees. Learn about the suffering of millions of our sisters and brothers who are displaced by war and famine. Sign the Action Card. Participate in a Walk that we expect will be organized in the Spring.

Click here

Sign the petition for at least two women observers at the Synod on Youth to be allowed to vote along with the two non-ordained men already given a vote. The petition will be hand delivered to bishops, cardinals, and all voting members attending the Synod in Rome, as well as to Cardinal Lorenzo Baldisseri, the Secretary General of the Synod of Bishops beginning October 18, 2018.
Click here.


Jesus came with a message of God's love and compassion for the poor and the marginalized and with a call to discipleship that embodies that loving tenderness. To live our call we seek Wisdom – Wisdom to see and to understand what we can do, be it great or small, to create a world of right relationships, harmony and peace.

+Jane

[Jane Kryzanowski, Regina, SK, is bishop for RCWP Canada.]





Judith Pellerin's Dancing My Life, Dancing My God uses the metaphor of dance to describe how life can be lived joyously and with fulfillment.  The concept of dance as prayer, as communication between self and God, is introduced in an engaging and accepting way for those seeking to discover deeper meaning in their communion with the Divine. 
Balanceing information on the history of dance as Spirit-led communication with more personal anecdotes of the meaning of dance for people today, Dancing My Life, Dancing My God offers a starting place for discussion and discovery of dancing a Spirit-filled life.

[Judith Pellerin, Regina, SK. has given permission to serialize her book.  Click here to read up to and including the Conclusion, Appendix, Acknowledgments and authors bio.]





Binding
The
Strong
Man

Radical Discipleship, radicaldiscipleship.net | Ordinary Time, 2018, Year B of the Revised Common Lectionary

As we transition into the summer months of Ordinary Time, we are celebrating the 30th anniversary of Binding The Strong Man, Ched Myers’ extraordinary political reading of Mark’s Gospel

[
For each Sunday of Ordinary Time, RCWP Canada semi-Monthly Review  posts links to Myers' comments.]




Why stay in the Church?  A little different nuance

Emil Kutarna, Special to The Review | October 15, 2015

Matt Malone, SJ’s article in America Magazine, September 5, 2018, is a professional, well thought out answer to why stay in the Church. I propose a little different nuance than just either in or out.
 
My credentials are meager. I studied Theology and was ordained in 1955. The Vatican Council and a lot of theology has been written since then. And I believe that I have read extensively enough that I think I have a fair grasp of the current trends in that field. I offer that grain of salt to take with my thoughts on staying in or leaving the church.
 
Suppose we say the Church is like the car you’ve had for many years; sure, a Cadillac if you like. It is quite old, but still beautiful to look at. The trimmings and upholstery are works of art. But it has been giving you trouble lately. Something has happened to the GPS system. It has taken you off course so far sometimes that you wonder why you keep it.
 
But it is hard to part with it. It has been in your family for years. This car was your wedding car. This car was part of so many celebrations, baptisms, First Communions, graduations, and even funerals. How beautiful it was to drive to Midnight Mass or Easter Sunrise and other parish gatherings. You can’t just abandon this car. It’s like a part of the family.
 
On the other hand, hey, let’s face hard facts – it’s only a car. It’s falling apart. It has caused you grief too often. Even the mechanics say it might not be repairable. It’s costing you a bundle now just to keep it in the garage. Nice antique, but you really wonder if it is more trouble than it’s worth.
 
So you’re making a decision, keep it or scrap it. But hey, you know what? You’re not limited to either/or. You have several choices:
 
One - you can keep it as an old faithful, a reminder of better days; take it out for a spin now and then, like Christmas and Easter, other celebrations and funerals.

Two - if you need to get somewhere more reliably, with less grief, you can keep the Caddy, but get a second, more comfortable car with a new GPS that will get you to where you want to go.

Three – if you are totally discouraged with the original Caddy, just let the old car go.
 
Conclusion: God will not send you to hell if you leave the Catholic Church (or get rid of the old Caddy).
 
[Emil Kutarna, Regina, SK]






Jane - loved your piece on the Gospel of John! (The Review, October 1, 2018) Plenty of food for thought.... (no pun intended) Making the scripture come alive in our present experience!

[Craig Van Parys, Regina, SK]




Feature Series ›

SYNOD ON THE YOUTH 2018  National Catholic Reporter



Tech Tip

Try the Search function on this page.  It can rapidly find almost every word you might be looking for on this page or in the five year old archives.





 Special
 Feature


As bishops’ summit opens, Catholic women say: ‘Let’s be a nuisance!’


Claire Giangravè, cruxnow.com | October 2, 2018

As women around the world attempt to shatter glass ceilings, fueled by the #Metoo movement, some Catholic women - tired of not being heard - would just be happy entering the Holy Door.

“We women have also [been guilty of] the sin of clericalism. We also have entered into the Church mentality,” said Lucetta Scaraffia, Chief Editor of Donna Chiesa Mondo, a magazine focusing on women’s issues and attached to the Vatican news outlet L’Osservatore Romano.

“We have placed ourselves outside a door that excluded us and asked for it to be opened,” she added.

Read More




Prelates Come Marching In, Women Sing, Police Strong Arm

FutureChurch,
futurechurch.org | October 2018

This afternoon about 20 women and men met to practice our singing and chanting for a planned protest at the Synod gates.  Organized by the ever creative Kate McElwee of Women’s Ordination Conference, we wanted to send a clear message that women should be voting members of the Synod, part of the “Votes for Catholic Women” campaign.  Women from Voices of Faith, Catholic Women Speak, Womens Ordination Worldwide, a group of Catholic women from Poland and the Czech Republic, We Are Church Ireland, and FutureChurch were there.

Read More

Daily Reports from the Synod (XV Ordinary General Assembly of the Synod of Bishops (Oct 3 – 28) officially titled “Young People, the Faith and Vocational Discernment.”
)




Catholic Women Speak network calls for church reform, focus on women

Jamie Manson, ncronline.org | Oct 3, 2018

Catholic Women Speak network gathered at the Pontifical University Antonianum Oct. 1, about 4 miles from where more than 300 Catholic bishops opening the Synod 2018 on Young People, the Faith and Vocational Discernment on Oct. 3.

The delegates gathering for the month-long synod of bishops will hear few, if any, women's voices inside their Vatican meeting hall. That's a situation that theologian Tina Beattie wants to remedy, even if it's from the other side of town.

Read More





For real change, we must get at four roots deeper than church structures

Joan Chittister, ncronline.org | September 20, 2018

In the midst of the angst that has accompanied the revelation of unparalleled amounts of sexual abuse of children in the Catholic Church, the cry for reform gets louder by the day.

For some, it's a call for the elimination of celibacy as an unnatural and therefore impossible way of life. For others, it's about barring homosexuals from the priesthood, as if homosexuality was in essence a model of immorality rather than simply another state of nature — just like heterosexuality with its own immoral aberrations. For many, it's about a lack of psychosocial development in seminaries; for others, it's about the liberalization of the church since the Second Vatican Council, no matter that the bulk of assaults happened, apparently, before the end of the council.

Indeed, there are as many explanations for this crisis in morals, spirituality, church and trust as there are people, dioceses, parents, priests, lawyers, whomever. But there is one element on which everyone seems to agree: There must be repentance. There must be accountability. There must be reform.

Good. And that looks like what?

Read More




Women's Ordination Conference asks you to sign petition to show your support for voting rights for women at the Synod

Kate McElwee, Women's Ordination Conference
| October 12, 2018

As the Synod of Bishops continues throughout the month of October, the lack of voting rights for women participating continues to be an elephant in the room. 

Even as the new guidelines for the Synod allow for two non-ordained religious brothers to vote, the religious sisters present are denied the same right. These qualified women are excluded simply on the basis of biological sex. 

There is no defensible reason for this. So we have partnered with Catholic Women Speak, FutureChurch, New Ways Ministry, Voices of Faith, Women's Ordination Worldwide along with other organizations to create a petition asking the bishops to change this sexist and indefensible practice. 

Will you add your name to our petition and show your support for voting rights for women at the Synod?

We will hand deliver the petition to bishops, cardinals, and all voting members attending the Synod in Rome, as well as to Cardinal Baldisseri, the Secretary General of the Synod of Bishops, beginning October 18th

Sign our petition today and share it with your friends. Women must have a voice and a vote in our Church -- and together, we can make it happen. 

Read More




WOMEN PRIESTS - A Catholic Commentary on the Vatican Declaration that only men can be ordained

Leonard Swidler and Arlene Swidler, editors, Paulist Press | 1977

Women Priests - A Catholic Commentary on the Vatican Declaration is an on-line book of 48 essays by Catholic theologians, republished on womenpriests.org website with the necessary permissions.  Free access to the book of essays is available here:  http://www.womenpriests.org/classic/wp_cont.asp




If you won't ordain them, don't baptize them.  You may give them ideas - For altar girls, a modest proposal




Kate Childs Graham, ncronline.org | September 22, 2011

From the very second I was old enough, I was an altar server. I couldn’t wait to don the garb, light the candles, ring the bells, wash the hands.

I performed my duties with the most piety any 9-year-old could muster, crossing my thumbs for perfect prayer hands, kneeling as straight as possible, hanging off every word that Fr. Jerry uttered -- all the while shooting telling glares to my fellow altar servers that were chewing gum, wearing sneakers, yawning or, heaven forbid, refusing to sing aloud.

I silently mouthed every word of the Eucharistic prayer. And when I went home, I re-imagined the mass for my friends, from “In the name of the Father...” to “...go in peace to love and serve the Lord.” I adored my church, my faith, my God.

As an altar server, the Catholic hierarchy was -- in spite of itself -- developing a leader, fostering a vocation in me, a girl.

I understand, then, why certain priests like Fr. John Lankeit of Ss. Simon and Jude Cathedral in Phoenix, Ariz., and Fr. Michael Taylor of Corpus Christi Catholic Mission in South Riding, Va., (a hop and a skip away from my own parish) are prohibiting girls from becoming altar servers.

Read More




Racism is more than a sin. It constitutes a heresy that undermines the very identity of the church


Joseph S. Flipper, commonwealmagazine.org |
September 24, 2018

Theologically understood, racism is more than a sin. It constitutes a heresy that undermines the very identity of the church. Taking form in ideology and systemic exclusion, racism threatens to co-opt Christianity because it offers a powerful anti-Christian narrative about who we are as human beings while invoking Europe’s “Christian heritage.” We should be alarmed not only at the physical violence racism provokes, but also at the signs of the re-animated gods of nation and blood. As 
Henri De Lubac recognized in the 1940s, unless the church embodies visibly what its doctrine proclaims it to be—the visible site of the reunification of a humanity divided by sin—it fails to be authentically catholic.

Read More




We are called to the Lord's supper because God calls us to be what we already are, love and mercy for each other

Mark Etling, ncronline.org | July 10, 2018

I love and need the celebration of the Eucharist. It brings me into communion with the universal church and the church of my fellow parishioners. It consoles and challenges me in the proclamation and application of the word of God, and it feeds me when I receive the body and blood of Christ. The Mass is a positive and important experience for me.

But there's a little phrase in the liturgy that bothers me a lot. It's this: "Lord, I am not worthy that you should come under my roof." Every time I hear those words, a voice within me shouts, "Lord, why am I not worthy?"

With all respect, I cannot help but challenge the assumption that I or anyone is unworthy to approach the table of the Lord.

Read More




Women must fight clericalism to heal church, Women Church World publication says

Carol Glatz, Catholic News Service | October 2, 2018

In response to current scandals, clericalism and the need for reform, Catholic women must take the initiative and make their voices be heard, according to a series of articles in a Vatican magazine.

The October edition of Women Church World, published Oct. 1 in conjunction with the Vatican newspaper, L’Osservatore Romano, dedicated its monthly issue to “Women Confronting the Crisis of the Church.”

Read More of the article above which summarizes the articles below

Articles in Women Church World, October 1, 2018 issue in English

Articles in Women Church World, October 1, 2018 issue in French




Catholic Women Called - Kathleen Gibbons Schuck

Catholic Women Called, Youtube video





Vatican II's reforms to the Mass were right and why the clergy's resistance to fully implementing the revisions are part of our current crisis

Steven Lanoux, Special to The Review | September 29, 2018

We're currently attending the Fullness of Truth conference in Austin.  Mass today was to honor the Feast of the Archangels.

It was more than merely an "Extraordinary" Mass in Latin. It was a full-on formal St. Michaelmas High Mass as celebrated between the fifth and eighteenth centuries.  We had seminarians helping with the Gregorian-chanted portions, multiple altar boys (no girls, of course), Deacons kneeling on the stone floor but not assisting in the ceremony, and naturally the Priest with his back to the congregation doing things no one but an altar boy could see and saying things only that boy could hear.  Even the Epistle and Gospel were sung in Latin.  One had to kneel up front for Communion--on the tongue only, mumbled phrase in Latin to go with it.

Six candles, incense by the ritualistic hierarchy (altar and cross get three sets of two thurible waves, priest gets one set of three waves, deacons each get one set of two waves, each altar server gets a single wave, and entire congregation gets one wave center, one left and one right), and, naturally, a collection.  Pure old school Catholicism.

And it really showed why Vatican II's reforms to the Mass were right and why the clergy's resistance to fully implementing the revisions are part of our current crisis.  Even a part of the Mass was called the "Secret" if you recall.  I think the mystery of the Mass is related to God's participation, not what the priest is doing at the altar.  But it exhibited the priest's power and how things are not to be shared with us commoners.

It was offensive, not beautiful.  It was exclusive, not for us or with us, and it showed that ONLY the priest talks to God.  Baloney!

The Latin Mass needs to go away.  It is part of the abusive system, focuses on the power of the priest, is male-exclusive, and highlights a language that means nothing to most.  It was a way to weaken Vatican II by re-authorizing exclusive power by the Church and emphasizing the separation of the clergy from the laity. 

Oh, and the celebrant was from the Holy Cross Order, the Crossiers, who went bankrupt in the US after paying off scandals from child abuse by priests and are now based out of Brazil. 

Small wonder that the "old way" was being espoused.

But then there was God's sense of humor to offset the darkness.  The proper Gospel for the Michaelmas is Matthew 18:1-10.  So the Crossier priest had to elaborate on Matthew 18:6, "...he that shall scandalize one of these little ones that believe in Me, it were better for him that a millstone should be hanged about his neck and that he should be drowned in the depth of the sea."  He called on the archangel to destroy the demons that had possessed the church and caused the current crisis.

He failed to note that the demons are wearing Roman collars.

[Steven Lanoux is a member of Call To Action - Rio Grande Valley and lives in Brownsville, TX]





Free access to on-line or pdf downloadable books and book-length articles:

195 Reasons Why Women Should Be Ordained
       by Editor, RCWP Canada Monthly Review
       
Women Priests -- Answering the Call
      by Catherine Cavanaugh

Gaudete et Exsultate
     by Pope Francis

Why Women Should Be Priests
     by Roy Bourgeois

Women Priests - A Catholic Commentary on the Vatican Declaration
      edited by Leonard Swidler and Arlene Swidler

Transgressive Traditions: Roman Catholic Womenpriests and the Problem of Women’s Ordination
      by Jill Marie Peterfeso


                                                                                                       




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